Month: September 2016

Embracing the 2% Mindset in Business

Embracing the 2% Mindset in Business_Business Rewritten

How can liking change, embracing the unknown and exploring new things not only raise your employees’ moral, but also increase your firm’s market value by approaching a proposal or a project in a new way?

I can still recall the outcry of protests and rallies being held across the country during the socio-political Occupy Movement in 2011, where being a member of the top 1% was synonymous with death threats. Despite the negative connotations of being associated with the top 1%’ers, or in this case, the 2%’ers, the 2% Mindset can be used as a tool for motivating young entrepreneurs to reinvigorating firm’s employees to exploring new means of business development and project methodology.

Embracing the 2% Mindset in Business_Business RewrittenThis 2% Mindset includes tenets of:

  • Embodying confidence
  • Having the courage to explore and try new things
  • Choosing happiness
  • Daring to take action in spite of fear

For me, starting my own marketing communications firm set the wheels in motion to embrace this 2% Mindset. A workaholic by nature, I was spending too many hours in an office environment where I made little time to explore various marketing strategies. Opening Business Rewritten, provided me the avenue to research and apply new marketing techniques and offer them to my clients.

I challenge the firms I work with to set aside time, whether during a Lunch ‘N Learn hour or a whole day retreat, to explore how we can all embrace this 2% Mindset. How can liking change, embracing the unknown and exploring new things not only raise your employees’ moral, but also increase your firm’s market value by approaching a proposal or a project in a new way?

Written by: Julie Wanzer, LEED AP

Authenticity and Relevance in Social Media Marketing

Authenticity and Relevance in Social Media Marketing_Business Rewritten

mobile-internet-trends-mary-meeker-2015-1

You want your firm’s social media posts to be authentic and reflect your core company values and areas of expertise that your firm offers.

As we head into the fourth quarter of 2016 and look towards planning ahead for your 2017 marketing strategies, social media has become more of an expectation than a nuance for almost all companies and associations, regardless of industry type. According to the 2015 YTD statistics from Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers (KPCB), American adults are spending 51% of their time per day on mobile digital media. In addition, the 2016 Business Insider Intelligence Social Engagement report found that 20% of the total time spent online per day in the U.S. is on social platforms. In order to reach your potential client/customer/membership base and capture a percentage of their time spent on social media, companies must establish a social media presence.

One of the first questions my clients ask me once they have recognized this need for a social media presence, is “What do I post on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, LinkedIn, Snapchat, etc?” I then spend the next twenty minutes or so asking them questions such as:

  • What are your core company values?
  • What areas of expertise does your company focus on?
  • What do you want your potential clients to know about you?
  • Describe the demographics of your ideal clients/customers/members

The answers to these questions obviously vary given the type of company or association sitting across from me in the conference room, but all of these answers relate to authenticity and relevance in social media marketing.

Authenticity and Relevance in Social Media Marketing_Business RewrittenYou want your firm’s social media posts to be authentic and reflect your core company values and areas of expertise that your firm offers. As a construction firm, you do not want to be posting about the latest brain surgery tactics or trending cat videos – rather focusing on innovative building techniques, your firm’s philanthropy in construction and the latest statistics influencing the construction market.

You also need to ensure that your firm’s social media posts are relevant to both your firm and to your potential client/membership base. As an engineering firm, what do you want to portray to your clients?

  • Your firm’s reliability?
  • Flexibility in a team structure?
  • Ease of use for design document collaboration?

Then take the time to define your ideal client to ensure your target social media demographics align with your ideal client/member demographics.

Written by: Julie Wanzer, LEED AP

Lessons Learned from One-Year Anniversary

Lessons Learned from One Year Anniversary_Business RewrittenAccording to the latest statistics from the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA), 21.5% of new businesses failed within the first year. In addition, the SBA found that entrepreneurship among Millennials is lower than compared to previous generations with less than 2% of Millennials reporting self-employment, compared to 7.6% for Generation X and 8.3% for Baby Boomers; with entrepreneurship growing much more slowly for Millennials as see in the figure below.

As Business Rewritten celebrates its official one-year anniversary this September, we are humbled to be a part of the outliers in these SBA statistics. Taking the plunge to start my own marketing firm at the age of 33 conjured up a number of fears and anxieties, but also ignited a flame of passion and determination to build something of my own.

Working in corporate America for the past 12 years holding various marketing, sales and business development positions, helped lay the foundation for Business Rewritten. Below are some of the lessons I learned that have helped Business Rewritten celebrate this important milestone:

  • It’s better to say NO to a client and be honest about your workflow, then to say YES and not deliver the best level of service
  • Relationships matter more than you think because at the end of the day, people like doing business with people they like
  • Referrals are the best compliment you can receive
  • Don’t forget to celebrate the small victories, but also learn from and evaluate the circumstances that led to the pitfalls

Written by: Julie Wanzer, LEED AP

Graph from SBA.gov

Thank Construction Workers for Labor Day

Labor Day

Long before Labor Day’s association with the end of summer, BBQ’s, and outdoor festivals, Labor Day was originally established as “a yearly national tribute to the contributions workers have made to the strength, prosperity and well-being” of the United States, according to the U.S. Department of Labor.

The labor groups responsible for the creation of Labor Day, which was first celebrated on September 5, 1882 in New York City, were construction workers. Peter J. McGuire, general secretary of the Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners, as well as Matthew Maguire, secretary of Local 344 of International Association of Machinists, are attributed for founding the holiday. These construction groups banded together to honor the vital force of labor that helped build America.

While you enjoy soaking up the last rays of sunshine at the pool and the extra day off from work, remember who was responsible for the holiday. Construction workers helped lay the foundation for America’s growth and are just as valuable now as they were 134 years ago when they were lobbying for a national holiday.

You can become a part of the construction movement by taking the first steps and registering for Construction Careers Now, a new program funded from a WORK Act Grant through the State of Colorado. You can choose from several key trades including carpentry, pipe laying, tile setting, glazing and masonry, to begin a career in construction. Help build Colorado and know that you can join an elite group that has been making history since 1882 honoring the American worker.

Written by: Julie Wanzer, LEED AP